1966 mustang (won't start)

Billy the kid

New Member
Sep 25, 2020
3
0
1
70
Gardners, Pennsylvania
HELP HELP...... Have a 66 mustang 289 was running just fine and I had to replace the alternator and voltage reg. and decide to replace the points now it will not start..... I replaced everything I can think of and still no go...... No voltage at the coil(replaced) new battery... replace the points and condenser ....... HELP HELP
 
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jack.stand.racing

New Member
Sep 23, 2020
7
0
1
41
North Texas
HELP HELP...... Have a 66 mustang 289 was running just fine and I had to replace the alternator and voltage reg. and decide to replace the points now it will not start..... I replaced everything I can think of and still no go...... No voltage at the coil(replaced) new battery... replace the points and condenser ....... HELP HELP

Been a long time since I've messed with points, but I will attempt to help walk through what I would start troubleshooting first. Since this could be simple or get pretty involved let's start here. You may have already done this, but doesn't hurt to start with basics again just to verify.

1. Have you double checked any connections that were touched while swapping parts? Double checked all your grounds...battery, alternator, voltage regulator, starter relay, and engine grounds. I think there is an ground from the coil to the distributor as well. And if you disconnected anything at the starter relay, double that you got those back on the correct terminals.

2. If everything with the grounds and hookups at starter relay appear correct, then time to check voltage at the starter relay. You should have voltage at the starter relay "I" terminal with the key in run position. Then voltage at "S" terminal while key in start position.

3. Next....just to clarify. When you say no voltage at the coil are you referring to no voltage through the incoming lead to the coil, or no voltage at the outgoing plug spout of the coil?
-- If no voltage directly at the incoming wire lead itself while key in starting position, then check that lead for continuity while off. The other end of that circuit should be a brown wire connected to the "I" terminal of the starter relay. The lead from the coil, and the lead from the starter relay "I" term. join together at a firewall plug, and come out the other end as a single resistive lead that runs to the ignition switch. So you should have continuity on that line while key is off. If you don't, then it's possible that whatever alternator and volt reg issues you had could have damaged the joining connection or the resistor wire breaking that circuit.
--Check voltage at the ignition switch directly, too. Just to cover more basis.

I feel this would be a good place to start. I'm about to call it a night, but I'll check back with you in the morning to see if you have any results yet.
 

Billy the kid

New Member
Sep 25, 2020
3
0
1
70
Gardners, Pennsylvania
Been a long time since I've messed with points, but I will attempt to help walk through what I would start troubleshooting first. Since this could be simple or get pretty involved let's start here. You may have already done this, but doesn't hurt to start with basics again just to verify.

1. Have you double checked any connections that were touched while swapping parts? Double checked all your grounds...battery, alternator, voltage regulator, starter relay, and engine grounds. I think there is an ground from the coil to the distributor as well. And if you disconnected anything at the starter relay, double that you got those back on the correct terminals.

2. If everything with the grounds and hookups at starter relay appear correct, then time to check voltage at the starter relay. You should have voltage at the starter relay "I" terminal with the key in run position. Then voltage at "S" terminal while key in start position.

3. Next....just to clarify. When you say no voltage at the coil are you referring to no voltage through the incoming lead to the coil, or no voltage at the outgoing plug spout of the coil?
-- If no voltage directly at the incoming wire lead itself while key in starting position, then check that lead for continuity while off. The other end of that circuit should be a brown wire connected to the "I" terminal of the starter relay. The lead from the coil, and the lead from the starter relay "I" term. join together at a firewall plug, and come out the other end as a single resistive lead that runs to the ignition switch. So you should have continuity on that line while key is off. If you don't, then it's possible that whatever alternator and volt reg issues you had could have damaged the joining connection or the resistor wire breaking that circuit.
--Check voltage at the ignition switch directly, too. Just to cover more basis.

I feel this would be a good place to start. I'm about to call it a night, but I'll check back with you in the morning to see if you have any results yet.
Thanks for the info I'll be getting to it tomorrow and I'll keep you posted ...... Have a GREAT day..... Bill
 

Desoto

New Member
Sep 9, 2007
6
0
1
Thanks for the info I'll be getting to it tomorrow and I'll keep you posted ...... Have a GREAT day..... Bill

I was a mechanic in the early 70's and I had so much trouble with new condensers being bad that if the points were not badly pitted I left the old condenser in the car because I felt it was more likely that the new one failed than the one that been in the car for over a year.