Electrical Eliminate Starter Solenoid?

RekeHavoc

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Dec 5, 2019
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@90sickfox, I saw one of your posts where you have both a 250A fuse and a megafuse block on your battery terminal. I assume the block is for your alternator cable. Is the 250A fuse on the cable feeding your starter?

That fuse should be able to handle a % of current above it's rating for a specified amount of time. I think the starter pulls something like 500A. I would think you would have to continually crank the engine for a few mins to cause it to blow. You aren't having any starting issues, are you?
 

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Rdub6

So while I wait to figure out my rear end issues
Dec 29, 2017
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I should have stated that I have not relocated my battery to the hatch. It is still in the factory location. I saw the pics of your setup in the other thread, but couldn't tell what size cables you or @Rdub6 are using. Do you think 2 AWG is sufficient or should I step up my game?

The cables that @Rdub6 got from BatteryCablesUSA look really nice.

Those were 4 gauge that I bought from them.
 
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90sickfox

Wasn't a pretty sight...and I've got big hands
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@90sickfox, I saw one of your posts where you have both a 250A fuse and a megafuse block on your battery terminal. I assume the block is for your alternator cable. Is the 250A fuse on the cable feeding your starter?

That fuse should be able to handle a % of current above it's rating for a specified amount of time. I think the starter pulls something like 500A. I would think you would have to continually crank the engine for a few mins to cause it to blow. You aren't having any starting issues, are you?

That's not on my starter cable. That's the only positive wire that isn't fused. One is for the alternator...the other is for my distribution block behind the drivers fender. The factory didn't fuse it and it would take a pretty hard crash to pinch that wire. At that point I'd probably be dead anyway.

No starting issues at all.

When a starter goes bad it can pull a lot of amps. That's probably why manufacturers probably leave that wire direct.
 
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RekeHavoc

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I have gotten some work done on the car. I have the junction block mounted in the fenderwell. I also ditched the stock starter solenoid and replaced it with the fuse/relay you see in the pic (since I have a mini-starter). I tried to mount everything in such a way that it can be easily accessible from within the engine bay via the washer reservoir access hole without having to take out the PITA fender liner. I am retaining my battery in the stock location.

I moved all of the stock wiring from the solenoid to the junction block. I also plan to add the 4 AWG cable (probably overkill) powering my amps to the junction block. This cable is fused for 60A. I may add Contour fans in the future which I believe pull ~42A at full tilt. If my math is correct, that would put me at ~180A max through the junction block. In reality, I would expect this to be much less as I plan on installing all LED lights. There is ~3' run of cable from the battery to the junction block. I think 4 AWG should be sufficient here?

I moved the power cables from my 3G alt and starter directly to the battery. Both are 4 AWG. Battery ground to block is 4 AWG. I also have the 10 AWG battery ground pigtail connected directly to the ECU ground cable on the sheet metal near the factory location.

I plan to add another 4 AWG ground from the block to the pigtail/ECU ground location. I assume it is best to ground this cable at the same location where the battery is grounded to the block (factory location near timing cover)?

I just need a sanity check to make sure I'm not getting my wires crossed (figuratively and literally).
 

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