200 ci Inline-6 with headers

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rbohm

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headers are not going to be much help, unless you are going to rework the head by porting the exhaust, and opening up the intake with more than just a two barrel conversion.
 
headers are not going to be much help, unless you are going to rework the head by porting the exhaust, and opening up the intake with more than just a two barrel conversion.
Obviously we’d do what needs to be done before putting on headers. Our plans right now for power are a 2 barrel carb and we’re looking into an electronic ignition since we’ve been told that can help the engine with its hesitation.
 

Noobz347

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I am a little confused.

Obviously we’d do what needs to be done before putting on headers.


What does this mean? Generally, headers are considered when the engine combination aspirates more fuel and air than the exhaust system and manifold are capable of handling. Installing a header (singular since it's an inline 6) and then building the motor to make use of that header makes no sense. :scratch:

Let's go back to the original question:

Quick question, I was thinking of adding headers to me and my dad’s ‘67 mustang. I’ve done a bunch of research on headers already, but I’m unsure if I need to change anything out before I add headers.


This is not a good plan and you should reconsider. Instead, look into what it might cost to bore and stroke that inline 6, port and polish head (or run an aftermarket head if available) and build the engine up to a level where it [necessitates] a larger exhaust and/or carburetor.

The OEM components that you are trying to replace have [all] been designed and tested for optimum performance on the engines that they were installed. Installing larger components at the nose and tail of your combination [will] result is less performance unless the engine combination is built to such an extent that it can make use of the extra capacity.

In other words: I don't think this the cheap/simple mod you're looking for.
 

Olivethefet

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Is it even possible to make good power with a 200 6 without spending loads of money? At the end of the day it's still a 200 6. For what it's worth I'd keep it all stock. Just give it a good tune up and enjoy it. If you want it to have more power then start putting together a plan to pull that old 6 out and replace it with a V8. Any V8, but I'm partial to the 289 in a vintage mustang like yours.
 

Noobz347

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Is it even possible to make good power with a 200 6 without spending loads of money? At the end of the day it's still a 200 6. For what it's worth I'd keep it all stock. Just give it a good tune up and enjoy it. If you want it to have more power then start putting together a plan to pull that old 6 out and replace it with a V8. Any V8, but I'm partial to the 289 in a vintage mustang like yours.


Really? I was thinking stock rebuild and supercharge. :chin
 
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Sorry for all this confusion, we’re new to owning a classic car and want to at least get some power out of the 6 because it only has 19,000 miles on and it’d kill us to have a low mileage engine just sitting in our shed. Also, I’m especially worried that doing the V8 swap is going to cost either as much or more than the car is even worth.
 

Noobz347

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Sorry for all this confusion, we’re new to owning a classic car and want to at least get some power out of the 6 because it only has 19,000 miles on and it’d kill us to have a low mileage engine just sitting in our shed. Also, I’m especially worried that doing the V8 swap is going to cost either as much or more than the car is even worth.


Ohhhhhhhh man... I'd plan out a supercharger system for this and see if it's in your realm of possibility.

Sounds to me like the motor has already had time to reveal any bugs. :D

We need a "Got Boost?" smiley. Who runs this circus? :fuss:
 

Olivethefet

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Welcome to the forum. Im not knocking what your doing. Just an opinion. There's something special about having an all original car and if the motor is really that low mileage I don't blame you for wanting to keep it.

If you really do want to make more power with that motor you'll have to spend some money on the whole motor. Intake, carb, ignition, head, cam, exhaust.

The carb and exhaust alone won't help much. Noobz is pulling your chain a little but he isn't wrong. I personally don't know anything about to 200 6, but in the end its just a motor the basics still apply just like they do with any other motor.

My best advice is to start digging around in this site for older builds. Lots of people are on here building fox body stuff. Not a lot of action with the old 6 cylinder stuff. @horse sence might be able to help. Google will be your friend as well. I know back in the day people used to make good power with the 300 6.

Good luck and we'll help if we can.
 
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Noobz347

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Note about the tags above:

Those tags will call the attention of the folks they depict. In other words: They'll get an alert for this thread when they log on and/or through e-mail.

You can also click those tags and look at their threads etc., to see what kinds of projects and threads they have going on.
 

wicked93gs

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There are plenty of things you can do to an I6 to make more power. @rbohm will be able to tell you more than a few. The things I would do with an I6 are very far from stock and would completely defeat the purpose of keeping a stock low mileage engine. Generally the mild I6 guys will throw on a header, electronic ignition, and a rebuilt carb and call it a day(you don't need to change the carb, just rebuild the one you have).

For wild things you can do:

1. swap the head to the aluminum head that Classic Inlines makes....its expensive, but makes a good chunk of power(defeats the purpose in keeping it stock)
2. swap to a different engine...either a v8 or a later Ford I6 from Australia with DOHC and 24v(again, defeats the purpose of keeping it stock)
3. Boost the engine, either with a supercharger, or more efficient turbocharger.....you can do this to an otherwise stock engine and make 200+ HP fairly easily...but there are of course downsides and considerations in designing a turbo system(especially one for a carbuerated application)...this is also expensive and neither this or option 1 will be much cheaper than a v8 swap.
4. Slap on an Australian crossflow aluminum head(these are hard to find, and require some modifications to fit the American block, but it puts the intake and exhaust on opposite side of the engine and makes a lot of power) Also expensive and defeats the purpose.
5. Swap transmissions to a T5 manual trans...this makes the car both more effecient at cruise speeds, and makes the car feel snappier under acceleration...it also allows you to retain your stock low mileage engine.
6. Just like v8s, changing the gears in the rear end will also make the car accelerate faster(at the cost of higher cruiser RPM...which would be mitigated if combined with a T5). It may be hard to find 3.73 gears for a 7", but I am sure they are out there somewhere.

One day I will build a I6 Mustang.....but my plan is to use a Jaguar DOHC all aluminum I6 and slap 3 Weber sidedrafts on it(not the most reliable engine choice perhaps, but DOHC all aluminum inline 6 engines that still use a distributor are few and far between)
 

7991LXnSHO

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Noobz, I think you greatly overestimate the engineering, power output goals and testing of 60’s Detroit 6 cylinder engine designs. They were usually durable, but power was not really the goal. Economy (for the factory and car buyer), and some torque were the goals I saw.
A cast iron exhaust manifold is far from optimal for power. Clifford has made many improved intake manifolds for the engines without the cast on intake logs. Porting (or replacing) the head will help, as will a turbo and T-5.
A V-8 will help more. :)


I am a little confused....
The OEM components that you are trying to replace have [all] been designed and tested for optimum performance on the engines that they were installed. Installing larger components at the nose and tail of your combination [will] result is less performance unless the engine combination is built to such an extent that it can make use of the extra capacity.
 

Noobz347

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Noobz, I think you greatly overestimate the engineering, power output goals and testing of 60’s Detroit 6 cylinder engine designs. They were usually durable, but power was not really the goal. Economy (for the factory and car buyer), and some torque were the goals I saw.
A cast iron exhaust manifold is far from optimal for power. Clifford has made many improved intake manifolds for the engines without the cast on intake logs. Porting (or replacing) the head will help, as will a turbo and T-5.
A V-8 will help more. :)


I dunno... I'm not thinking about enough power to set the world on fire. Just enough to give a little grunt and grumble for cruise. I don't know what all the differences are/were but I know some in-line 6 Grenada's in the '80s that took a fair amount of juice and scooted pretty well. The carb-hat situation notwithstanding, what else might get in the way?
 
I appreciate all the replies. Everyone seems to say we should do V8 swap and I don’t blame y’all. We’ve decided to start with an electronic ignition as our first little engine upgrade. We got a Pertronix Electronic Ignition Igniter II from CJ Pony Parts.