2000 Gt Engine Swap- In Progress

ConnorM37

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Aug 10, 2017
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#1
Greetings everybody. Im new here and my mechanical experience is not very extensive. I have a nice 2000 gt that I love and it needs an engine swap. I feel like I know my car well enough though to work on it myself. I was close to selling it but I couldn't let a car like this slip out of my grasp especially if it meant a downgrade, i've liked mustangs for years as i'm sure most of us do. Instead I saved all my money for 4 months and bought a new rebuilt engine with ford performance heads from a company called Tri Star. Im attempting to do the swap myself and i'm going to be relying on the resources at my disposal.

Its a rebuilt version of the stock engine but with upgraded heads from ford. I kept it the same engine so I wouldn't have to account for any other differences.


I'm putting this out there to see if anyone has any experience or advice for me up front before I start. Im wondering about parts of this job that may be more prone to hiccups or complications and also what tools yall could recommend besides the cherry picker.(Probably asking friends to borrow tools or I'll go rent/buy) Any comments will be helpful, thanks for your time.


Pre-Engine Swap

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Davedacarpainter

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#2
Welcome to Stangnet.

I'll move your thread over to our '96-'04 general talk subforum. You'll get lots of help there.

Sweet mustang, btw:nice:

It's good to have you with us.
 

LarsD

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#3
Having R&R'd several motors but not on a mod car I can only offer general advice. Use blue painter's tape and a marker to mark wire harness plugs so you remember where they go. Buy a box of sandwich bags to put bolts in, and write on the bags where you took them out. Even if you think you will remember where this stuff goes, do it anyway, I have seen a lot of projects come apart, then stall for months, and by the time the car starts to go back together you can't remember what goes where. Also take tons of photos during disassembly.
 

ConnorM37

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Aug 10, 2017
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#4
That's good advice, I already have gathered an army of bags and sticky notes, ill do that with the tape too. Right now before I start I'm also wondering if there anything that's easy to maybe break or mess up upon engine removal. I'm right about to get into this, comp is set up next to my car in the garage lol
 

Neuron

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Nov 6, 2016
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#6
A knowledgeable friend and/or YouTube would be a big help. Good advice above, especially the pictures and baggies. All new hoses, belts, and check vacuum hoses closely. A lot of work but not terribly difficult. The more wrenches, screwdrivers etc you have to choose from the easier it is to get into tight places. Flare nut wrenches can save the day sometimes.
 

ConnorM37

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Aug 10, 2017
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#7
I think I want to do all new hoses but I don't know how much work that would be. Is there a place or link that you know where I could find hoses? AmericanMuscle maybe?
 

Neuron

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Nov 6, 2016
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#8
I prefer the Motorcraft Hoses when I can find them. I use Rock Auto and check with local parts houses for availability. Most of the time there are pictures to help match up the part and if local you can take it with you to match up. Rock Auto is very good about returns too. I have also found them cheap on Amazon who also has a good return policy if needed.
 
Aug 22, 2017
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#9
Hello there! Like everybody has stated already pics are a huge plus! Labels, baggies etc. Floor jack(s) are a must as well as adequate jack stands. Basic tools should get you through such as a standard and metric socket set. Sometimes you will need long sockets due to timing cover bolts having a studded end. Basic wrench set and screwdrivers. (Phillips and flat) and Pliers for the factory hose clamps on radiator hoses if you cant get the special tool. That should be enough to get most of your stuff out of the way. I know the motor mount nuts require a bigger socket i believe its a 21 mm or so which that socket doesn't typically come in a standard set. I can double check when i get home.
 

ConnorM37

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Aug 10, 2017
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#10
Anyone know how to disconnect the fuel lines from the engine without fuel spraying everywhere?
Am I about to learn how to siphon gas?
 
Aug 22, 2017
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#11
Its almost certain some gas will come out. Just put a rag under the connection while disconnecting it.
 

Noobz347

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#12
Anyone know how to disconnect the fuel lines from the engine without fuel spraying everywhere?
Am I about to learn how to siphon gas?

You should see a relief valve somewhere near the fuel rails or regulator. Press on the core with a rag under/over until it stops.

Disconnect your fuel rails (this requires a special tool). Now you can pump your gas out instead of siphoning. It's a hell of a lot faster. :D
 

ConnorM37

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Aug 10, 2017
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#13
Awesome guys thanks for the tips, I got that done yesterday. What I ended up doing, because I found a hose, was siphoning it. However I needed to thread a smaller hose down the main hose because this year had some kind of siphoning blocker. It worked out for me and apparently the fuel slowly drains from the fuel lines back into the tank after a month or two of sitting so luckily it wasn't too messy. Quick work
 

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