CCRM, PCM, or something else?

mjcarguy

Member
Mar 19, 2020
23
1
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39
lombard, IL
So I tried doing testing, the code reader is coming up with the following codes now:

B1 318 battery low voltage
B1 869 lamp airbag light circuit fail

I then found an article on using the instrument cluster HEC DTC code procedure. I did that, and got the following codes:

9681 -PATSTranceiver Signal is Not Received (Not Connected, Damaged, or Wiring)
D262 - Missing SCP message
D043 - SCP Invalid or missing data for Traction Control

Thoughts on where to proceed?
 
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wmburns

SN Certified Technician
Aug 14, 2009
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It's important to keep the battery fully charged during trouble shooting.

Also don't over look the fact that some of the DTC's might be caused by some of the trouble shooting steps performed. For example if testing with the IC disconnected it should be expected to get PATS messages.

It may be necessary to clear DTC codes after each trouble shooting steps.
 

mjcarguy

Member
Mar 19, 2020
23
1
13
39
lombard, IL
I have been keeping the trickle charger on the battery to keep the power up. I ordered a re-man pcm that comes preprogrammed with my vin # to see if that does the trick. It wasn’t much more than what it would cost to have the car towed somewhere. I might try a few more pinpoint tests while I wait for it to get here. I will keep posting as i find out anything
 

mjcarguy

Member
Mar 19, 2020
23
1
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39
lombard, IL
So after checking and rechecking wires, grounds, fuses, etc... I ordered a replacement PCM. Plugged it in, ran the module initialization using the forscan tool, I was able to start her up. It was a lot of work, but I am glad I did all the testing before replacing a bunch of parts. Also, it has boosted my confidence to actually try doing more work on it. Big thanks to wmburns!
 

wmburns

SN Certified Technician
Aug 14, 2009
5,849
506
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Houston Texas
^^This is great news! I vote that you should get a big pat on the back for doing the tests before replacing $$ parts. You had done enough work to know that there was little outside of the PCM for the problem to be.

I'm sure there are others on the Forums that could benefit from your experience with the PCM replacement process?
  • Who did you order it from?
  • Did they pre-load the configurations based upon your VIN?
  • How did they handle the anti-theft(PATS)? IE did they send it with PATS disabled?
  • What was your experience with the ForScan software like (lessons learned)? Did it change your thoughts about how to use an ODB2 scanner for future trouble shooting?
 

mjcarguy

Member
Mar 19, 2020
23
1
13
39
lombard, IL
Thanks, Burns! Definitely felt good to figure it out. In terms of the PCM replacement process:

- I went to FlagshipOne for the PCM (https://www.fs1inc.com/). They sell re-manufactured ECUs
- I found the part number I needed, supplied them with my VIN, and they did the pre-load based on that.
- PATS system had to be updated to recognize the new PCM. I used the extended license from the Forscan tool($10 for a 1-year license - best money spent on an automotive tool), which allows you to access the anti-theft system on the car. I had to then initialize the new PCM.
- The ForScan works pretty well, It took a little figuring out exactly how to do the PATS piece, but overall not bad. I think having done it once now, it will be easier to use it for other things. I think it offers a lot of useful information, laid out well for someone that isn't a professional mechanic. It is better than the more expensive OBDII scanner that I bought to use on my other vehicles a few years ago. (although the drawback is it only works on Fords)

Overall, learning to check the electrical wiring and troubleshooting took time, but in the end saved me a lot of $$. Nothing more frustrating than spending $100-150 on a part, only to find out that wasn't the problem.