Fox GT side ground effect issues

91TwighlightGT

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Question for y'all... If I go with cervenis... Do I have to remove all of the metal brackets on the rockers and fenders?

Thinking more I may go that way or everytime I look at the car and see some be warp in the side skirts it will bother me. Thanks
I think that you will. EDIT: At least on the fenders, probably not on the rockers the way they attach.

I used cervinis on my Cobra clone project, although it was an LX, but unlike OEM Cobra pieces they do not use the GT fender brackets.

I do like the Cervini's quality. Some do not like the fact that they attach via sheet metal screw and double sided tape.

I'd be surprised if a urethane piece cannot be straightened. With enough heat they can be manipulated pretty easily, so heating and clamping should work. You may call a body shop as well and ask a few questions.

I'd definitely go with cervinis over an LX conversion. Tracking down all the little molding bits, having to replace both bumpers, repairing the holes left by the GT hardware kit... it can be done, but it's definitely some work.
 
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Gs1987GT

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Thanks for your reply. I'm going to go buy a 1x3x8 and then cut that down to 2 or 3 foot, 2 pieces so I have 2 pieces them to clamp on both sides of the ground effect while it's hot

If I mess up the paint on my OE ones, no harm no foul as they are horrible in current condition anyway. When I measured, a 1x3 (2.5" actual) will just fit under the upper lip on the side and fill the side.

We'll see, good thing I bought a heat gun years ago from HF so I already have that.
 
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KRUISR

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Just remember to heat is slowly and evenly. You don't want to create a warp because you tried to go too fast.
 
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Gs1987GT

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Update; I attempted pressing the warps out of my OEM side skirts. I made them better but they still have some waves in them and the wood I used to press them dulled the paint on the painted side.

My OEM ones are in real bad shape though so I'm not suprised.

The replacement ones, the right one had some minor waves on its aft portion behind the mustang lettering I was able to press out and make look good.

The problem is I can't find anyone who will strip them for me. Every place I call is afraid to touch them. So at this point I'm going to pressure wash them to see how much paint I can strip off and then see what I have to work with.

This whole issue is why I really don't like GTs....lol....yes I bought one, but the ground effects always get ugly over time and then you have to deal with issues like this. The story continues....
 

Noobz347

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Don't worry about stripping them. They're all plastic. Sand the transitions down smooth, clean, spray plastic surface prep, prime, and paint.


This is what I do with the plastic pieces anyway. Let me see if I can find you a pro opinion: @95steedamustang

As far as reshaping goes... I find our plastics pretty easy to work with. I generally secure them into the shape/mold I want first and then warm them slowly. Reattachment always involves the addition of the RED 3M two-sided sticky tape.

If you insist on blasting them clean (not my first choice), it can be done with one of these:


Easy enough. I've used this thing on small parts etc.

Oh... and I clean all my plastics with alcohol before spraying with the prep. It helps to clean off all the 'cleaners' etc. :O_o:


Lastly... I've gotten pretty good at repairing the interior/exterior plastics as well. Bottom line up front: Green Painters Tape / JB Weld / Fiberglass reinforcement / careful sanding / rotary tool with brown or maroon Scotch Brite pads

You can probably see where this is going...


Looks good so far! Take your time (of course). I think you'll end up getting what you are after. :nice:
 
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Gs1987GT

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Don't worry about stripping them. They're all plastic. Sand the transitions down smooth, clean, spray plastic surface prep, prime, and paint.


This is what I do with the plastic pieces anyway. Let me see if I can find you a pro opinion: @95steedamustang

As far as reshaping goes... I find our plastics pretty easy to work with. I generally secure them into the shape/mold I want first and then warm them slowly. Reattachment always involves the addition of the RED 3M two-sided sticky tape.

If you insist on blasting them clean (not my first choice), it can be done with one of these:


Easy enough. I've used this thing on small parts etc.

Oh... and I clean all my plastics with alcohol before spraying with the prep. It helps to clean off all the 'cleaners' etc. :O_o:


Lastly... I've gotten pretty good at repairing the interior/exterior plastics as well. Bottom line up front: Green Painters Tape / JB Weld / Fiberglass reinforcement / careful sanding / rotary tool with brown or maroon Scotch Brite pads

You can probably see where this is going...


Looks good so far! Take your time (of course). I think you'll end up getting what you are after. :nice:

Much appreciated. Thanks Noobz. I'm going to pressure wash them and then the body shop I'm working with will sand them and prep for paint. See how it works out. I just hope after this a hot day in the summer does not warp these replacements...we'll see.