Electrical New Momo, No spark

Potomus Pete

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Mar 7, 2019
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I dont know if the wheel did it or not. I didnt have a horn so I cut the wires, I drove two miles and died----towed away. checked the no start for no spark. No power at coil. Im not good with electric. Fuses look good. Is there a big fuse somewhere , also should I replace the module on the column . It seems solid but its only sixteen bucks...Give me some ideas I miss this car bad thanks , pete. .
 
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Potomus Pete

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Mar 7, 2019
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cmon reply you guys can rewire a whole car just tell me if it could be a fuse. Checlklist says inline fuse near starter solenoid I cant see it. Are the plugs inline fuses. Does my cut alrbags have anything to do with it. Was so exited to see no airbag light. anything else in between the key and the coil minus the computer[][=][/]. thanks I know somebody has an answer
 

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General karthief

wonder how much it would cost to ship you a pair
Mod Dude
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As I understand it, you have a cranks ok but no start situation. Start at the top of the cranks ok but no start checklist. It covers every no start situation. Veryuseful.com has wiring diagrams.
 

2000xp8

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If you screwed with the steering wheel and then it happened, i'd check all the wires that go into every connector on the column.
Those connectors get brittle and the plastic holders that hold the pins in break.
Push the wires back in one by one.
I know when I did my column swap, pretty much every connector had to be replaced.
 

2000xp8

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And figure out why you don't have a horn.
You'll be sorry someday when an old lady is backing into you and you can't get her attention.
 
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Potomus Pete

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.I believe the horn problem is in the fender. I am not good with electric . Im going to do the whole steering column thing. Carefully going over each wire. If that does not work its getting towed to the shop. If any of you guys know anything about an inline fuse or a relay that can be changed id be grateful im getting a new top and Im on a budget and I really hate the shop
 

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jrichker

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Potomus Pete said:
I am not good with electric....
You have two choices...
Pray and then try to fix it
OR
Walk...

There are no inline fuses, only fuse links,

Fuse links come with a current rating just like fuses. A clue as to what current they are designed for is to look at the size wire they protect.

Choose the fuse according to the wire size.

Keep in mind that the wire size in the chart is for the circuit itself, not the size of the fuse link. The packages of fuse link repair material you can get at the auto parts stores also will have a current rating on them.

Fuse link material is available at most good auto parts stores. There may even be a fuse link already made up specifically for your car. Just be sure to solder the connection and cover it with heat shrink tubing.

Heat shrink tubing is available at Radio Shack or other electronics supply stores.

See the video below for help on soldering and heat shrinking wiring. There is a lot of useful help and hints if you don’t do automotive electrical work all the time.

View: http://youtu.be/uaYdCRjDr4A

For free automotive electrical training, see Automotive Training and Resource Site . I have personally reviewed the material and it is very good.



Horn troubleshooting
The horn circuit has a button that supplies ground, a relay that uses the button to switch the horns on and off, and two horns. The relay reduces the current that the horn button has to carry. This makes it possible to use a small and simple switch and slip ring on the steering wheel.

Note that the horn ground is built into the horn mount bracket, so the horn must be mounted on metal with a good connection to the car body.





The horns typically develop an internal short to ground, which causes the fuses to blow. :eek:

The horns are located under the car on the driver's side, forward of the front wheel well. Disconnect BOTH horns, replace the fuse: if the fuse blows immediately, the problem is most likely in the cigar lighter circuit. If not, then press the horn button on the steering wheel: if the fuse blows the problem is in the wiring between the horn relay and the horn. If doesn't blow when you press the horn button, connect ONE of the horns and try again. If it still doesn't blow the fuse, connect the other horn. Chances are that the first horn you re-connect will blow the fuse. Whatever horn blows the fuse at this point has an internal short and is trash. Time for a trip to the junkyard... :crazy:

Horn does not honk, but does not blow fuses:
Run a jumper wire from the battery positive terminal to the horn input connector: the horn should honk. If it does, then your problems are in the other parts of the circuit. If it does not honk, replace the horn.
Use a test light or voltmeter and connect one lead to the horn wire under the fender and the other to ground. Push the horn button: you should see 12 volts or the test light will turn on. If it does not, check the fuse. If the fuse is good, check the relay.

The relay will click and honk the horn if you short the Yellow/Lt Green wire to ground. If you have a test light connected in place of the horn it will light. If it does not activate the horn or test light, look for 12 volts at the Lt blue/white wire. No 12 volts at the Lt blue/white wire, you have fuse or wiring problems in the circuit that supplies the 12 volts to the relay. Good 12 volts at the Lt blue/white wire and the Yellow/Lt Green wire shorted to ground and no honk or flash of the test light, replace the relay.

The rubber foam usually deteriorates over time and that is what makes the horn switch fail. Take it apart and replace the foam with some from packaging material. A little creative engineering may be required, but you can do it.


Cranks OK, but No Start Checklist for Fuel Injected 5.0 Mustangs model years 1986-1995

A word about this checklist before you start: it is arranged in a specific order to put the most likely failure items first. That will save you time, energy and money. Start at the top of the list and work your way down. Jumping around will possibly cause you to miss just what you need to see to find and fix the problem. Don’t skip any steps because the next step depends on the last step working correctly.

Revised 26-Jul-2017 to add fuse link diagram.

All text applies to all models unless stated otherwise.

Note: 94-95 specific changes are in red

1.) Remove push on connector (small red/blue wire) from starter solenoid and turn ignition switch to the Run position. Place car in neutral or Park and set the parking brake. Remove the coil wire from distributor & and hold it 3/8” away from the engine block. Jumper the screw to the big bolt on the starter solenoid that has the battery wire connected to it. You should get a nice fat blue spark.

Most of the items are electrical in nature, so a test light, or even better, a voltmeter, is helpful to be sure they have power to them.

No spark, possible failed items in order of their probability:
A.) MSD, Crane, or other ignition box if present - Bypass it and return to stock configuration if possible. Do this as a temporary measure to eliminate it as a possible problem source.
B.) PIP sensor in distributor. The PIP sensor supplies the timing pulse to trigger the TFI and injectors. A failing PIP sensor will sometimes let the engine start if the SPOUT is removed. See paragraph 5A – Using a noid light will tell if the PIP is working by flashing when the engine is cranking.
C.) TFI module: use a test light to check the TFI module. Place one lead of the test light on the red/green wire on the ignition coil connector and the other lead on the dark green/yellow wire on the ignition coil connector. If the TFI is working properly, the test light will flash when the engine is cranked using the ignition switch.
D.) Coil
E.) No EEC or computer power - EEC or computer relay failure
86-93 models only: EEC relay next to computer - look for 12 volts at the fuel injector red wires.
94-95 models only: EEC or PCM power relay in the constant control relay module. Look for 12 volts at the fuel injector red wires.
Both 86-93 and 94-95 models: No 12 volts with the ignition switch in the run position on the fuel injector red wires. The relay has failed or there is no power coming from the ignition switch. Make sure that there is 12 volts on the red/green wire on the coil before replacing the relay.
F.) No EEC or computer power - fuse or fuse link failure
86-93 models only: Fuse links in wiring harness - look for 12 volts at the fuel injector red wires. All the fuse links live in a bundle up near the starter solenoid. Look for a 20 gauge blue fuse link connected to 2 black/orange 14 gauge wires.
94-95 models only: 20 amp EEC fuse in the engine compartment fuse box. Look for 12 volts at the fuel injector red wires.
G.) Ignition switch - look for 12 volts at the ignition coil red/lt green wire. No 12 volts, blown fuse link or faulty ignition switch. Remove the plastic from around the ignition switch and look for 12 volts on the red/green wire on the ignition switch with it in the Run position. No 12 volts and the ignition switch is faulty. If 12 volts is present in the Run position at the ignition switch but not at the coil, then the fuse or fuse link is blown.
Note: fuses or fuse links blow for a reason. Don’t replace either a fuse or fuse link with one with a larger rating than stock. Doing so invites an electrical fire.
Ignition fuse links may be replaced with an inline fuse holder and 5 amp fuse for troubleshooting purposes.
94-95 models only: Check inside fuse panel for fuse #18 blown – 20 amp fuse
H.) Missing or loose computer power ground. The computer has its own dedicated power ground that comes off the ground pigtail on the battery ground wire. Due to it's proximity to the battery, it may become corroded by acid fumes from the battery.
In 86-90 model cars, it is a black cylinder about 2 1/2" long by 1" diameter with a black/lt green wire.
In 91-95 model cars it is a black cylinder about 2 1/2" long by 1" diameter with a black/white wire.
You'll find it up next to the starter solenoid where the wire goes into the wiring harness
I.) Computer. Don’t replace the computer just because you don’t understand how it works. Computers seldom fail, it usually is a sensor or wiring problem that causes the problems.
J.) Bad or missing secondary power ground. It is located between the back of the intake manifold and the driver's side firewall. It supplies ground for the alternator, A/C compressor clutch and other electrical accessories such as the gauges.
K.) Engine fires briefly, but dies immediately when the key is released to the Run position. Crank the engine & when it fires off, pull the small push on connector (red/blue wire) off the starter relay (Looks like it is stuck on a screw). Hold the switch in the crank position: if it continues to run there is a problem with either the ignition switch or TFI module. Check for 12 volts at the red/green wire on the coil with the switch in the Run position. Good 12 volts, then replace the TFI.
See the Ignition switch wiring diagram for more information on the ignition wiring fuse link because it is the next thing to be tested. You will need a Multimeter or DVM and know how to use the Ohms function to check continuity between the red/green wire on the ignition coil and the red/green wire on the ignition switch. Make sure that the ignition switch is in the off position when you do the check. You should see less than 1 Ω (Ohm) between the red/green wire on the coil and the red/green wire on the ignition switch. More than 1 Ω means that the fuse link may have blown open and needs to be replaced. If you get 1 Ω or less means the fuse link is OK and the ignition switch is bad.

Wiring Diagrams:
See the following website for some help from Tmoss (diagram designer) & Stang&2Birds (website host) for help on 88-95 wiring Mustang FAQ - Engine Information Everyone should bookmark this site.


Ignition switch wiring
IgnitionSwitchWiring.gif


Fuel, alternator, A/C and ignition wiring
fuel-alt-links-ign-ac.gif


Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 88-91 Mass Air Mustangs
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/88-91_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 91-93 Mass Air Mustangs
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/91-93_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 94-95 Mass Air Mustangs
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/94-95_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

AutoZone wiring diagrams: You can navigate to the diagrams yourself via Repair Info | AutoZone.com and select the car year, make, model and engine. That will enable you to bring up the wiring diagram for your particular car.

2.) Spark at coil wire, pull #1 plug wire off at the spark plug and check to see spark. No spark, possible failed items in order of their probability: [/b]
A.) Moisture inside distributor – remove cap, dry off & spray with WD40
B.) Distributor cap
C.) Rotor
D.) Spark Plug wires
E.) Coil weak or intermittent - you should see 3/8" fat blue spark with a good coil

3.) Spark at spark plug, but no start.
Next, get a can of starting fluid (ether) from your local auto parts store: costs a $1.30 or so. Then pull the air duct off at the throttle body elbow, open the throttle, and spray the ether in it. Reconnect the air duct and try to start the car. Do not try to start the car without reconnecting the air duct.

Two reasons:
1.) If it backfires, the chance for a serious fire is increased.
2.) On Mass Air cars, the computer needs to measure the MAF flow once the engine starts.

If it starts then, you have a fuel management issue. Continue the checklist with emphasis of fuel related items that follow. If it doesn’t, then it is a computer or timing issue: see Step 4.

Clue – listen for the fuel pump to prime when you first turn the ignition switch on. It should run for 2-4 seconds and shut off. To trick the fuel pump into running, find the EEC test connector and jump the connector in the Upper RH corner to ground. The EEC connector is near the wiper motor and LH hood hinge.



If the relay & inertia switch are OK, you will have power to the pump. Check fuel pressure – remove the cap from the Schrader valve behind the alternator and depress the core. Fuel should squirt out, catch it in a rag. Beware of fire hazard when you do this. In a pinch, you can use a tire pressure gauge to measure the fuel pressure. It may not be completely accurate, but you will have some clue as to how much pressure you have. If you have any doubts about having sufficient fuel flow/pressure, rent a fuel pressure test gauge from the auto parts store. That will tell you for sure if you have adequate fuel pressure.

4.) No fuel pressure, possible failed items in order of their probability:

A.) Tripped inertia switch – Coupe & hatch cars hide it under the plastic trim covering the driver's side taillight. Use the voltmeter or test light to make sure you have power to both sides of the switch
B.) Fuel pump power relay – located under the driver’s seat in most stangs built before 92. On 92 and later model cars it is located below the Mass Air Flow meter. Look for 12 volts at the Pink/Black wire on the fuel pump relay.
C.) Clogged fuel filter
D.) Failed fuel pump

E.) 86-90 models only: Blown fuse link in wiring harness. Look for 12 volts at the Orange/Lt Blue wire on the fuel pump relay.
91-93 models only Blown fuse link in wiring harness. Look for 12 volts at the Pink/Black wire on the fuel pump relay.

The fuse links for all model years 86-93 live in the wiring harness near the starter solenoid.



64326.gif




94-95 models only: 20 amp fuel pump fuse in the engine compartment fuse box. Look for 12 volts at the Dark green/yellow wire on the constant control relay module.

F.) Engine seem to load up on fuel and may have black smoke at the tailpipe. Fuel pressure regulator failed. Remove the vacuum line from the regulator and inspect for fuel escaping while the pump is running. If fuel is coming out the vacuum port, the regulator has failed. Check the regulator vacuum line for fuel too. Disconnect it from the engine and blow air though it. If you find gas, the regulator has failed.

5.) Fuel pressure OK, the injectors are not firing.
A.) The PIP sensor in the distributor tells the computer when to fire the injectors. A failing PIP sensor will sometimes let the engine start if the SPOUT is removed.
A noid light available from any auto parts store, is one way to test the injector circuit to see if the injectors are firing. The noid light plugs into the fuel injector harness in place of any easily accessible injector. Plug it in and try to start the engine: it will flash if the injector is firing.
I like to use an old injector with compressed air applied to the injector where the fuel rail would normally connect. I hook the whole thing up, apply compressed air to the injector and stick it in a paper cup of soapy water. When the engine cranks with the ignition switch on, if the injector fires, it makes bubbles. Cheap if you have the stuff laying around, and works good too.
B.) Pull an injector wire connector off and look for 12 volts on the red wire when the ignition switch is on.
C.) No power, then look for problems with the 10 pin connecter (salt & pepper shakers at the rear of the upper manifold).

See the graphic for the 10 pin connector circuit layout.


The injector power pin is the VPWR pin in the black 10 pin connector.

D.) No power and the 10 pin connections are good: look for broken wiring between the orange/black wire on the EEC relay and the red wire for the 10 pin connectors.
E.) TPS voltage exceeds 3.7 volts with the throttle closed. This will shut off the injectors, since the computer uses this strategy to clear a flooded engine. Use a DVM, a pair of safety pins, and probe the black/white and green wires to measure the TPS voltage.

On a 94-95 Mustang, probe the black/white and grey/white wires to measure the TPS voltage.

It should be .5-.1.0 volts with the key on, engine not running. Note that if the black/white wire (signal ground) has a bad connection, you will get some strange readings. Make a second measurement using the battery post as the ground to eliminate any ground problems. If the readings are different by more than 5%, you may have a high resistance condition in the black/white signal ground circuit.

6.) Spark & fuel pressure OK.
A.) Failed IAB or improperly set base idle (no airflow to start engine). Press the throttle ¼ way down and try to start the car. See the "Surging Idle Checklist for help with all your idle/stall problems.
B.) Failed computer (not very likely)
C.) Engine ignition or cam timing off: only likely if the engine has been worked on recently. If you removed the distributor, there is a good probability that you installed it 180 degrees out of time.
D.) Firing order off: HO & 351 use a different firing order from the non HO engines.

HO & 351W 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8

Non HO 1-5-4-2-6-3-7-8

E.) No start when hot - Press the throttle to the floor & try starting it, if you get this far. If it starts, replace the ECT.

F. ) Engine that has had the heads off or valves adjusted. Do a compression test to make sure the valves are not adjusted too tight. You should have a minimum of 90 PSI on a cold engine.



The following are diagrams courtesy of Tmoss & Stang&2birds

See the following website for some help from Tmoss (diagram designer) & Stang&2Birds (website host) for help on 88-95 wiring; http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/ Everyone should bookmark this site.


TFI module wiring for 94-95 Mustang GT
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/Mustang-94-95-IgnitionControlModule.gif

Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 94-95 Mustangs
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/94-95_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 91-93 Mass Air Mustangs
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/91-93_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 88-90 Mass Air Mustangs
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/88-91_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

5.0 wiring diagram for Fuel Injectors, Sensors, and Actuators
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/fuel-alt-links-ign-ac.gif

Ignition switch wiring
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/IgnitionSwitchWiring.gif

O2 sensor wiring harness
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustangO2Harness.gif

Vacuum diagram 89-93 Mustangs
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustangFoxFordVacuumDiagram.jpg

HVAC vacuum diagram
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/Mustang_AC_heat_vacuum_controls.gif

TFI module differences & pin out
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/TFI_5.0_comparison.gif

Fuse box layout
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/MustangFuseBox.gif

Mustang 5.0 Lights and Radio schematic, by TMoss:
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustangFoxLights-Radio_diag.gif

87-92 power window wiring
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustang87-92 PowerWindowWiring.gif

93 power window wiring
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustang93PowerWindows.gif

T5 Cutaway showing T5 internal parts
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/5_Speed_Cutaway_Illustrated.jpg

Visual comparison of the Ford Fuel Injectors, picture by TMoss:
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/Ford_Injector_Guide.jpg

Convertible top motor wiring http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustang88VertTopMotorCkt.gif

Engine mounted fuel injector harness
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustangEngineHarness.gif

Location of the TPS, IAB, and the 10-pin connectors on a 5.0, picture by TMoss:
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/TPS_IAB_Pic.jpg

Starter circuit
http://forums.stangnet.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=21328&d=1080916057

Alternator diagram for 94-95 Mustangs.
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/Mustang-94-95-Alt.gif[/b]
 

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Potomus Pete

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Mar 7, 2019
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Sarasota Florida
I bought all the elec. tools , and checked everything. Im going for the pip. Im a pretty good garage mechanic and Ive never done a distributor removal. Some people say if you dont have a press you cant get the sprocket off. Says just get a rebuilt. I want to keep mine . Can I pull the gear off in the garage with a vise????? and should I get any orher rebuild parts???? any tips ??? thanks
 

Wayne Waldrep

5 Year Member
Apr 14, 2003
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I'm not gonna say it's impossible to get the gear off without a press because I'm sure some lucky soul has done it...once...but I've never done it or seen it done. You have to use a punch to knock the pin out first. Be very careful not to bend the center main shaft because I've seen them bend and it doesn't take much of a bend to mess it up. If you do press it out just go very slow. Last one I did I actually heated up the gear and then pressed it. It wouldn't go without the heat. I have a couple oem units and yes they are made WAY better than anything at the parts stores. My friend manages an O'Reilly here and I took their complete distributor home a while back to troubleshoot what ended up being a coil problem. Just turning the distributor to set timing you could feel the flex in it. Was total junk. Use all Motorcraft parts for the best results, in my opinion. Rockauto has all the pieces.
 

Potomus Pete

Member
Mar 7, 2019
61
14
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55
Sarasota Florida
I saw a wheel puller trick that seemed to work. If I cant get it Ill buy one , very scary for me. So far I seem like a pro with this car. The noid light doesnt flash like its supposed to on the injector, nor does it on the coil. The only thing Im concerned about is would the pickup just die. Also my fuel pump does not seem to prime when I turn the key. Didnt I read that it is controlled by the pip.. Thanks, if I can fix this myself with the help of the checklist Im not gonna believe it. Next I might be good enough for heads.
 
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Potomus Pete

Member
Mar 7, 2019
61
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Sarasota Florida
OMG....... There is no way I can get this gear off with a gear puller. Im going to Mikes Towing here is Sarasota where it 90 degrees and dry as hell to see if I can bring my distributor to them and have them do the pip. We will see. Ill report the price and if it works.
 
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Wayne Waldrep

5 Year Member
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OMG....... There is no way I can get this gear off with a gear puller. Im going to Mikes Towing here is Sarasota where it 90 degrees and dry as hell to see if I can bring my distributor to them and have them do the pip. We will see. Ill report the price and if it works.
:pop:
 

Potomus Pete

Member
Mar 7, 2019
61
14
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55
Sarasota Florida
Am an idiot. In my haste I marked my dizzy shell. Did not mark the rotor. There is a really good post on install and timing but Im kicking myself. This problem is a real learning experience. I need to learn this anyway because I have a nice budget on this car and I hope to get some Flotech heads or SVE. thats a discussion for another day. I have a four in. power pipe , headers 90 mil.throttle body..just need to breath.
 

2000xp8

SN Certified Technician
Aug 8, 2003
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Am an idiot. In my haste I marked my dizzy shell. Did not mark the rotor. There is a really good post on install and timing but Im kicking myself. This problem is a real learning experience. I need to learn this anyway because I have a nice budget on this car and I hope to get some Flotech heads or SVE. thats a discussion for another day. I have a four in. power pipe , headers 90 mil.throttle body..just need to breath.
If you have a nice budget for this car, don't use any of those parts you just listed and definitely have this discussion another day before you start throwing money around.
The heads are both junk and a 90mm throttle is only the perfect size if you make 1000rwhp, with those heads you will be about 750rwhp short.
Most intakes will only take up to a 70mm throttle body.
 

Potomus Pete

Member
Mar 7, 2019
61
14
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55
Sarasota Florida
I know I bought the power adder package from Anderson when I first bought the car. I thought that would do the trick. I want a daily driver thats kinda fast. I really dont want a new intake because I cant afford it . Just heads only. I know I screwed up , but what heads do you suggest. Iv really researched the Flotecks. Could trickflows be the answer. I canf afford the AFR. I just brought my distributor to Barbics and the guy was on it, and gave me a few tips.
 

Potomus Pete

Member
Mar 7, 2019
61
14
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55
Sarasota Florida
It cost a hundred bucks for the guy to put a new pip in. Probably took half hour for him to do it. Now I have to tdc this thing Im freaking out. I cant believe I did not mark the rotor.
 

Wayne Waldrep

5 Year Member
Apr 14, 2003
396
216
63
52
Cuba, AL
There's several folks on here that can help you with this better than me...So I'll wait for them on the step by step. It's not a big deal though so don't get worried about it. I never mark mine. This may sound crazy but I always stop my rotor exactly at the place where it's pointing straight back at the intake. One tooth off either way makes plenty enough difference to tell if you are off or not once you put it back in. I then pull the distributor. When I put it back in I look at nothing but the rotor button and put it back pointing the same way. Then I always time it with a light. Never failed me yet and never had to pull a spark plug.
 
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General karthief

wonder how much it would cost to ship you a pair
Mod Dude
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pull #1 plug (actually pull all the plugs, makes it easy to turn the engine by hand) hold your finger over the #1 spark plug hole and turn the engine over till you feel air pushing out, your balancer should be near TDC, turn the engine by hand to TDC, stab the distributor in using the mark you made on the distributor housing and the block (that is the mark you made right?) with the rotor at about the 11 o'clock position, this will get you in the ball park if the rotor moves to the #1 plug wire.
pull the spout, start 'er up and set base timing, mine seems to like 12*, shut it down and plug the spout back in.
 

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