Fox OBD/ computer question

gearhead77

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Mar 13, 2019
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So I’ve gotten the car all back together, there’s no leaks I can find, but it runs poorly at start and isn’t smooth at all. So I hooked up my Innova code reader and it thought the car was a 6 cylinder. Tried again and it said 4 cylinder. So I bought a new code reader and it registered as an 8 cylinder but the gave me a 66 code. I checked the MAF voltage and all seems ok.

I tried again and now it thinks the car is a 6 cylinder again? Anyone else have these problems? Batteries are fresh in the device.
 
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Mustang5L5

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Displaying 6cyl is common with testing with the Innova 3145. Many people, including myself, will get that even if the vehicle is running perfectly fine. I would ignore it and push through with your diagnostic testing.
 

jrichker

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So I’ve gotten the car all back together, there’s no leaks I can find, but it runs poorly at start and isn’t smooth at all. So I hooked up my Innova code reader and it thought the car was a 6 cylinder. Tried again and it said 4 cylinder. So I bought a new code reader and it registered as an 8 cylinder but the gave me a 66 code. I checked the MAF voltage and all seems ok.

I tried again and now it thinks the car is a 6 cylinder again? Anyone else have these problems? Batteries are fresh in the device.
Code 66 or 157 MAF below minimum test voltage.

Revised 2 Nov 2019 to add details on MAF testing

Insufficient or no voltage from MAF. Dirty MAF element, bad MAF, bad MAF wiring, missing power to MAF. Check for missing +12 volts on this circuit. Check the two links for a wiring diagram to help you find the red wire for computer power relay switched +12 volts. Check for 12 volts between the red and black wires on the MAF heater (usually pins A & B). while the connector is plugged into the MAF. This may require the use of a couple of safety pins to probe the MAF connector from the back side of it.

Computer wiring harness connector, wire side.
71316.gif


Computer wiring harness connector, computer side.
88243.gif


Diagrams courtesy of Tmoss and Stang&2Birds

ECC Diagram for 88-90 5.0 Mustangs
88-91_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif


ECC Diagram for 91-93 5.0 Mustangs
www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/91-93_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

94-95 Diagram for 94-95 5.0 Mustangs[/b]
94-95_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif



How the MAF works

There are three parts in a MAF: the heater, the sensor element and the amplifier. The heater heats the MAF sensor element causing the resistance to increase. The amplifier buffers the MAF output signal and has a resistor that is laser trimmed to provide an output range compatible with the computer's load tables. Changes in RPM causes the airflow to increase or decrease, changing the voltage output. The increase of air across the MAF sensor element causes it to cool, allowing more voltage to pass and telling the computer to increase the fuel flow. A decrease in airflow causes the MAF sensor element to get warmer, decreasing the voltage and reducing the fuel flow.

Actually, MAF pins C & D float with reference to ground. The signal output of the MAF is a differential amplifier setup. Pins C & D both carry the output signal, but one pin's output is inverted from the other. The difference in signal between C & D is what the computer's input circuit is looking for. The difference in the two outputs helps cancel out electrical noise generated by the ignition system and other components. Since the noise will be of the same polarity, wave shape and magnitude, the differential input of the computer electronically subtracts it from the signal. Then it passes the signal on to an Analog to Digital converter section inside the computer's CPU chip.

The MAF element is secured by 2 screws & has 1 wiring connector. To clean the element, remove it from the MAF housing and spray it down with electronic parts cleaner or non-inflammable brake parts cleaner (same stuff in a bigger can and cheaper too).
89-90 Model cars: Measure the MAF output at pins C & D on the MAF connector (dark blue/orange and tan/light blue) or at pins 50 & 9 on the computer. Be sure to measure the sensor output by measuring across the pins and not between the pins and ground.

91-95 Model cars: Measure the MAF output at pins C & D on the MAF connector light blue/red and tan/light blue) or at pins 50 & 9 on the computer. Be sure to measure the sensor output by measuring across the pins and not between the pins and ground.

MAF output readings: Use the computer connector diagram to help choose the proper pin connection on the computer when measuring the MAF output voltage. The idling voltage check can the done with the voltmeter directly stuck in the backside of the MAF connector.

At idle = approximately .6 volt
20 MPH = approximately 1.10 volt
40 MPH = approximately 1.70 volt
60 MPH = approximately 2.10 volt

If the output of the C&D pins exceeds the specs above, there are two possible problems:

1.) The MAF sensor is defective and needs to be replaced.
2.) The MAF sensor is installed in a different housing than the one it was designed for. The sensor is designed to work with a specific MAF part number or model MAF housing.

Check the resistance of the MAF signal wiring
For the next 2 checks make your measurement with the MAF disconnected from the wiring harness.

Pin D on the MAF wiring harness and pin 50 on the computer (dark blue/orange wire) should be less than 2 ohms. Pin C on the MAF wiring harness and pin 9 on the computer (tan/light blue wire) should be less than 2 ohms.

There should be a minimum of 10K ohms between either pin C or D on the MAF wiring connector and pins A or B.

Reconnect the MAF to the wiring harness and proceed to the next section.



See the following website for some help from Tmoss (diagram designer) & Stang&2Birds (website host) for help on 88-95 wiring http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/

Ignition switch wiring
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/IgnitionSwitchWiring.gif

Fuel pump, alternator, ignition & A/C wiring
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/fuel-alt-links-ign-ac.gif

Computer, actuator & sensor wiring
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/88-91_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

Fuse panel layout
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/MustangFuseBox.gif

Vacuum routing
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustangFoxFordVacuumDiagram.jpg
 
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gearhead77

Active Member
Mar 13, 2019
108
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Pittsburgh PA
@jrichker, I appreciate that, I found it also on another one of the multiple threads you've helped out on.

Turns out, at least as of this moment right now, that the new Delphi MAF sensor wasn't 100%, because I bought a Cardone re-manufactured one (with the housing) on a whim on Amazon. Maybe it was just rejecting having a Delphi part in it ;)

I checked all the voltage as you stated above (except at the computer pins) and unless I did something wrong, the readings were all nominal, so I decided to just get another MAF to rule it out. Returns are nearly free anymore, right? Might have been one of those fluke things that you can't catch. I'm a pilot by trade and if I had a dollar for the number of times I've had an airplane do weird electrical stuff, called maintenance and then it works fine when they show up, I'd have some decent money set aside! Stray electrons, as someone said to me once.

Because now there's no stumble, no stall, no misfire, nothing. It runs as close to brand new as it will ever get at 31 years old. And I love it.
 
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