Forced Induction Whipple Or Roush

justyntym

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Mar 2, 2017
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S550 GT performance pack. I am seriously considering a supercharger (90% sure). Was only looking for a roush but the whipple looks amazing (especially the torque...wow).


What's everybody think...roush or whipple.


BTW- not doing the track or strip...this is pretty much my dream car/garage kept weekend car. I just know once I put on a supercharger (and exhaust)...engine is done for good
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I Bleed Ford Blue

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Feb 13, 2017
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The K brace that goes between the cowl and the strut towers has to be cut on the drivers side to fit the roush rendering it useless. This is due to the rear inlet design of the roush. The whipple is a front inlet so you don't have to cut the K brace. Both designs require you to ditch the strut tower brace that goes over the top of the engine. The roush uses it's own belt drive system, where-as the whipple uses the serpentine belt system that is already there. There is an upgrade for the whipple that goes from a 6 rib belt to a 10 rib and it has an optional 20% overdrive ATI damper. Finally the roush displaces 2.3 liter, while the whipple is 2.9 liter. Larger displacement means you can spin the blower slower to get the same boost which equates to less heat and less hp to drive the unit. Also the larger displacement has the capacity for more boost and more power if you've got the built bottom end to handle it
 

usaf_branham

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Oct 30, 2008
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The Whipple install looks factory. I'd be willing to bet that the KB install doesn't. Also, the performance between KB and Whipple should be similar.
 

Jasonwithana

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I Bleed Ford Blue

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The whipple is a twin screw also. The roush is a roots style, albeit modified and improved, but still a roots. Also they say the roots style compresses the air in the blower, where-as the twin screw compresses the air in the manifold. The theory is it is more efficient to compress it in the manifold and imparts less heat into the air, so that also improves efficiency.
 
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84Ttop

They make new pistons every day, so why worry?
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Jul 2, 2009
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At the end of the day if we are left with only those two options, I would certainly choose the Whipple over the Roush. I've seen far better performance from the whipple, not that the Roush doesn't perform but I personally think the whipple is built with better components and is of higher quality.
 

usaf_branham

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Well none of them look factory. Lol
From what I have read (correct me if I'm wrong) the kb is twin screw where as the whipple is a roots. Twin screw is way more efficient ...

http://kennebell.net/KBWebsite/Common/pdfs/twinscrew-vs-roots-fromcatalog.pdf
Whipple is twin screw as well.

I put a KB 2.1 9psi intercooled kit on my '04 Mustang... it performed well, but had some issues I didn't care for. All of the non-billet aluminum corroded, even at 11 psi, the car didn't make the power advertised by KB, they didn't take the extra time to build plug and play wiring harnesses (I hate chopping up factory harnesses), their intercooler sucks, their inlet leaves much to be desired (hence the sheet metal inlets that were being made), their customer service is marginal, and they act like they are the end all be all encyclopedia of knowledge and no one could possibly make any improvements to their design, even though people have made more power by port matching & inlet/tb modifications.

Note: I absolutely loved my old car and the only things I would have done differently is getting the KB 2.6 instead of the 2.1 and I would have put stage 2 blower cams in it instead of the stage 1's.

As for my '15, if given the choice between the Roush and the Whipple, I would get the Whipple kit. I wish I would have got that kit instead of the procharger... I chose the procharger for ease of installation, cost, and because I wanted to try something different. I now realize the down fall of centrifugal superchargers... don't get me wrong, the car is stooopid fast and pulls like a freight train at the top of the rpm band... it is like a stock coyote below 3500 rpm. I really miss that low rpm torque since it is a driver.
 

Jonathan Lafferty

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Apr 6, 2017
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Hello, I am new to owning a supercharged mustang. I had a question for anyone that has one. My mustang is a roush stage 3 with a phase 2 supercharger pushing around 727hp. When I get it on it at a stand still the back end always kicks out. I am nervous attempting to nail it when I am cruising at like 50-60mph. Has anyone attempted does it launch ok or does it still want to kick out???

Thanks
Jonathan
 

usaf_branham

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It still kicks out. Mine goes to right every time. It's done it to me around 70 or so... pucker factor of 10. I'm pretty sure I had to use a toothpick to get the underwear out of my teeth. I should invest in drag radials. Lol.
 

Step90

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Jul 16, 2018
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I’m looking into getting the Whipple as well..my only concern is what all parts should I get before I even install that on my ride. I’ve already installed springs and I have the proper wheels for it to handle. Do I need a new drive shaft..half shafts..clutch and flywheel..new fuel injection? I just don’t want to install it and my ride not be able to handle the power and something snap.