Engine Multiple engine codes

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General karthief

wonder how much it would cost to ship you a pair
Mod Dude
Aug 25, 2016
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Codes indicate a rich mix (42-92), I'm concerned about the 12 code, unable to control rpms (self test?) Try taking the spout out and see if it will rev up.
18 is the kam failed (keep alive memory)
Have you done the surging idle checklist?
 

TTSaleen05

Member
Sep 7, 2019
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Yes, surging idle check list is complete. I took the spout out and it will rev only if you give it full throttle. It’s definitely running rich
 

General karthief

wonder how much it would cost to ship you a pair
Mod Dude
Aug 25, 2016
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polk county florida
Ok, back to basics.
new plugs, check timing, also check to see if it advances when you raise the rpms, also watch the light to see if the spark is constant or breaks up.
that is what I would do anyway.
 

TTSaleen05

Member
Sep 7, 2019
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Geez I just purchased those plugs a week ago, can I just take them out and clean them? I will make a video of the timing check while revving it up and post it. But Remember, part throttle to get it up above 1000RPMS will just break up and sound like a 2-step
 

General karthief

wonder how much it would cost to ship you a pair
Mod Dude
Aug 25, 2016
13,885
4,373
193
polk county florida
Watch the timing light. It is not consistent when flashing. You have an ignition problem. Coil, wiring, something with the spark. Can you get a spark tester and test to see if the coil is firing consistent, check the wiring to the coil, all wires in the ignition system is suspect.
 

TTSaleen05

Member
Sep 7, 2019
115
4
18
32
Louisiana
Yes I have a spark tester, it connects to the coil and the coil wire and in between is a see-through deal that shows spark. All wires including the TFI wires, ignition switch wires, the two wires that lead to the coil?
 

jrichker

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Pulled the ECM apart, it appears as if the capacitors are leaking? Could this be the culprit?
That can cause all sorts of weird problems. They will need to be replaced.

That is an electrolytic capacitor or what is commonly called, a cap. They have a definite life cycle and after 22 or more years, they start to fail. The failure mode is they dry out because the liquid electrolyte leaks out. Then they burn up or blow the top out of the can that they are packaged in. A clue to failure is the top of the can starts to bulge. When you see one bulging it has either failed or is in the process of Many of the automotive computer repair places will replace all of them as a first step in any repair efforts. The capacitors have a voltage rating, a capacitance rating, a tolerance for the capacitance rating, an operating temp rating and a life cycle rating. They also have a specification for cab size and lead placement

The higher the voltage rating, the larger physical size of the capacitor when compared to one with the same capacitance and a lower voltage rating. Most of the ones used in automotive electronics have a 20-35 volt rating since they are used in low voltage circuits. Using one with a higher voltage rating doesn't hurt anything, but it usually doesn't have any benefits either. There may be a size limitation because of the way the circuit board is laid out. That means there are sometimes limits on replacing the 20 volt cap with a 35 volt cap because it won't physically fit in the space allocated on the circuit board.

The higher temp rating and longer lifecycle ratings increase the cost of a capacitor. In automotive circuits, those are important factors, and the highest rating stands the best chance of lasting the longest and working the best. Most capacitors used in automotive applications are rated at 105° C The typical capacitor used in most automotive electronics is less than $1.50 each.

Some informative help from YouTube…
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCSNWi3UHf4


WWW.digikey.com or www.newark.com are good sources for capacitors, resistors and just about any other quality electronic part. Avoid Radio Shack unless it is a temporary repair or emergency situation. Almost all of their parts are less than top quality stuff and a lot of it is just plain junk.


That's the easy part now here comes the gotcha... The circuit boards are almost all multilayer construction. That means you have to be able to apply enough heat with a pencil tip soldering tool to melt the solder on at least 4 layers and some times more. Then you need to have a solder sucker to suck up the solder once it turns molten but before it burn or damages the PCB (Printed Circuit Board). I have been fixing PCB's in computers for40 years now and it is still a challenge to do it right and not make a mess of it.
The capacitors have a stripe on the side of the can that indicates polarity. Make sure that you match the polarity markings on the capacitor with the polarity markings on the PCB.

Some more help from YouTube…
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urGB_IUXSIM