TPS Voltage reading

johnny21

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Jan 26, 2020
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Hello all! I ran a KOEO test to see what codes were present on my 87 and I got a couple. Starting at the top with code 23 I went attempt to read/adjust the TPS sensor voltage using these procedures and this multimeter I put a threading needle through the green wire - with the ignition in the on position and the multimeter set to the 1.5v setting it reads between .03 and .05 and I am not sure I understand as I believe I should be seeing something just below/around the 1 volt range, any recommendations?
 
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johnny21

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Thanks Karthief - I was hoping for a reading in that range but I was getting between .03 - .05 which seemed way too low.
 

Mustang5L5

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Make sure your testing voltage from green to the black wire on the sensor. Do not use vehicle ground.
 
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General karthief

wonder how much it would cost to ship you a pair
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I like it to be closer to 1.0 but I found my car liked to be set around .87 but the computer takes a tps reading every time the car is turned on.
It will also depend on where your throttle adjustment screw is, don't forget it helps to reset the computer too.
What is your reading at WoT?
 

johnny21

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Jan 26, 2020
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Okay - I was testing it against car ground which may explain the unexpected reading then. Going to to re-check and will update.
 
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johnny21

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Update: when I test the TPS green wire (multimeter red) against the TPS black wire (multimeter black) in the KOEO position I get about the same result as previously observed.
 

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Mustang5L5

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Ok, back to the green wire, do you get any voltage reading if you manually move the throttle blade?

I’m thinking this tps sensor is junk if it’s got 5v input but no output
 
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johnny21

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Ok, back to the green wire, do you get any voltage reading if you manually move the throttle blade?

I’m thinking this tps sensor is junk if it’s got 5v input but no output
Just the little bit of voltage similar to what was seen earlier - it does seem to move a little as I change throttle position but it's not anywhere near the right range. I am going to order a new replacement TPS sensor to see if that resolves this issue.
 

Haste347

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It should be at least 4.5 volts at WOT (CPU sees 4.5 as WOT). IAB unplugged idle around 5-600rpm w/throttle screw, this should give you at round .8-1v idle with a properly adjusted TPS. The voltage should definitely increase in a linear fashion as you increase throttle. Any voltage spikes, or lag indicate a faulty TPS sensor. You may need to elongate the plastic screw holes on the sensor itself in order to get it adjusted correctly.
 

Decipha

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As long as the tps is between .7 and 1.25 volts at closed throttle its set perfect.

make sure the key is on when your testing. And be sure you use the wires at the tps for power and not the battery as it will be skewed.
 
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jrichker

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Hello all! I ran a KOEO test to see what codes were present on my 87 and I got a couple. Starting at the top with code 23 I went attempt to read/adjust the TPS sensor voltage using these procedures and this multimeter I put a threading needle through the green wire - with the ignition in the on position and the multimeter set to the 1.5v setting it reads between .03 and .05 and I am not sure I understand as I believe I should be seeing something just below/around the 1 volt range, any recommendations?
Here's all the TPS information you need in one place in an easily understood format...

TPS Troubleshooting and testing

Revised 29-Jun-2018 to add increasing idle speed after engine start.

The TPS signal ground is not the same as the engine block or car body ground. Do not use the engine block or car body as a ground when checking the signal ground wiring or the TPS voltage!!! You will get incorrect readings that will vary with the amount of electrical load on the electrical system.


Setting the TPS: you'll need a good Digital Voltmeter (DVM) to do the job. Set the TPS voltage at .5- 1.1 range. Because of the variables involved with the tolerances of both computer and DVM, I would shoot for somewhere between .6 and 1.0 volts. Unless you have a Fluke or other high grade DVM, the second digit past the decimal point on cheap DVM’s is probably fantasy. There is no advantage to setting it to .99; that is a BOZO Internet myth, complete with red nose and big floppy shoes.

Since the computer zeros out the TPS voltage every time it powers up, playing with the settings isn't an effective aid to performance or drivability. The main purpose of checking the TPS is to make sure it isn't way out of range and causing problems.


Wire colors & functions:
Orange/white = 5 volt VREF from the computer
Dark Green/lt green = TPS output to computer
Black/white = Signal ground from computer

TPS troubleshooting steps:
1.) Use the Orange/white & Black white wires to verify the TPS has the correct 5 volts source from the computer.
2.) Use the Dark Green/lt green & Black/white wires to set the TPS base voltage. Try this... All you need is less than 1.0 volt at idle and more than 4.25 at Wide Open Throttle (WOT). You'll need a voltmeter with a 1 or 3 volt low scale to do the job.

The Orange/White wire is the VREF 5 volts from the computer. You use the Dark Green/Lt green wire (TPS signal) and the Black/White wire (TPS ground) to set the TPS. Use a pair of safety pins to probe the TPS connector from the rear of the connector. You may find it a little difficult to make a good connection, but keep trying. Put the safety pins in the Dark Green/Lt green wire and Black/White wire. Make sure the ignition switch is in the Run position but the engine isn't running. Set the voltmeter on the 2 volt range if it doesn’t auto range.

Here’s a TPS tip I got from NoGo50

When you installed the sensor make sure you place it on the peg right and then tighten it down properly. Loosen the back screw a tiny bit so the sensor can pivot and loosen the front screw enough so you can move it just a little in very small increments. I wouldn’t try to adjust it using marks.

(copied from MustangMax, Glendale AZ)

A.) Always adjust the TPS and Idle with the engine at operating temp. Dive it around for a bit if you can and get it nice and warm.

B.) When you probe the leads of the TPS, do not use an engine ground, put the ground probe into the lead of the TPS. You should be connecting both meter probes to the TPS and not one to the TPS and the other to ground.

C.) Always reset the computer whenever you adjust the TPS or clean/change any sensors. I just pull the battery cable off for 10 minutes.

D.) The key is to adjust the TPS voltage and reset the computer whenever the idle screw is changed.

TPS voltage should be less than 1.1 volt at closed throttle and 4.25 volts or more at WOT

The TPS is a variable resistor, must like the volume control knob on a cheap radio. We have all heard them crackle and pop when the volume is adjusted. The TPS sensor has the same problem: wear on the resistor element makes places that create electrical noise. This electrical noise confuses the computer, because it expects to see a smooth increase or decrease as the throttle is opened or closed.

TPS testing: most of the time a failed TPS will set code 23 or 63, but not always. Use either an analog meter or a DVM with an analog bar graph and connect the leads as instructed above. Turn the ignition switch to the Run position, but do not start the engine. Note the voltage with the throttle closed. Slowly open the throttle and watch the voltage increase smoothly, slowly close the throttle and watch the voltage decrease smoothly. If the voltage jumps around and isn’t smooth, the TPS has some worn places in the resistor element. When the throttle is closed, make sure that the voltage is the same as what it was when you started. If it varies more than 10%, the TPS is suspect of being worn in the idle range of its travel.

TPS will not go below 1 volt

Note: Make all resistance checks with the ignition switch in the OFF position. Failure to do so will result in incorrect results and may possibly damage the meter.

Engine mounted sensor circuit: Check the resistance between the black/white wire on the TPS and battery ground. It should be less than 1 ohm. Higher resistance than 1 ohm indicates a problem with the 10 pin connector, computer or the splice inside the main harness where the wire from the 10 pin connectors joins the rest of the black/white wire.

attachments\49009



See the graphic for the location of the 10 pin connectors:
Diagram courtesy of Tmoss & Stang&2birds

TPS_IAB_Pic.jpg


See the graphic for the 10 pin connector circuit layout.
68512.jpg


Unplug the white 10 pin connector to do some resistance testing. It is good time to clean the connector pins and examine the connector for corrosion, broken wire or other damage. See http://www.themustangstop.com/tech-articles/cleaning-10-pin-connectors-mustang for help in this department.

If the resistance on the TPS Black/White wire and pin 1 of the white engine fuel injector harness 10 pin connector is more than 1.0 ohm, you have bad connection or broken wiring. Repeat the test using the pin 1 of the white body side 10 pin connector and battery ground. You should have less that 1 ohm. More than that is a damaged signal ground inside the computer or bad connections or wiring. [/b]


Idle speed increases after the engine has started and been driven:
When you start the car, the computer reads the TPS output voltage and uses that as a starting baseline or minimum TPS voltage for the TPS sensor.

As the engine warms up, the TPS voltage can slowly creep up past whatever voltage it saw when the engine first started. That causes the idle RPM to increase.

When you shut the ignition off and then restart the engine, the computer reads the voltage and sets whatever voltage it sees as the minimum TPS voltage for the TPS sensor, even if that voltage is more than 1.1 volt.

The first place to look is for a bad TPS signal ground, broken signal ground wire, or bad connection in the TPS wiring. The TPS connector plug and the 10 pin connector are the two most likely culprits.

The other thing to consider is a bad TPS sensor. Again, dumping the computer codes is a must do item on your troubleshooting checklist. See http://www.stangnet.com/mustang-forums/threads/how-to-pull-codes-from-eec4.889006/ or "Surging Idle Checklist